“We have not built this place, we have regenerated it.”

Since the Roman Empire, this was a land of vineyards and wine. However, with the arrival of the Aragón canal, the phylloxera, the rural exodus and the plucking of vines, 90% of the vineyards of the region disappeared. We are now able to recover parts of these, thanks to the Arnó family.

 

As owners of a construction company, the Arnó family planted vineyards on the barren ground of an old gravel pit to have it restored, and also recover the winemaking tradition of the area to make the best wine this land can offer.

 

Hence, the historical names of the area which refer to the vineyards and the winemaking tradition, such as “El Pla de les Vinyes”, “El Vinyet”, “Mas La Parra” or “Botella”.

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familia-arno-02

Since the Roman Empire, this was a land of vineyards and wine. However, with the arrival of the Aragón canal, the phylloxera, the rural exodus and the plucking of vines, 90% of the vineyards of the region disappeared. We are now able to recover parts of these, thanks to the Arnó family.

As owners of a construction company, the Arnó family planted vineyards on the barren ground of an old gravel pit to have it restored, and also recover the winemaking tradition of the area to make the best wine this land can offer.

Hence the historical names of the area which refer to the vineyards and the winemaking tradition, such as “El Pla de les Vinyes”, “El Vinyet”, “Mas La Parra” or “Botella”.

A natural
paradise

On the axis between the Pyrenees and the Ebro Valley, the longest gypsum mountain range in Europe rises. La Serra Llarga is part of this, and also happens to be where we have found an ideal place to make great wine.

 

A natural location where extreme climate contrasts and soil composition make up the ideal setting for growing vines.

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As our ancestors would say – we live in the best part of the country, possibly even the best part of the world, to grow fruit.

The secret lies in the soil of our terroirs rich in gypsum, that provides our wines with freshness and salinity making them absolutely gastronomic.

From extreme cold to suffocating heat.

For these soils there is no known middle ground, but we know that the extreme climate contrasts are crucial to our wines’ color, flavor and texture, and that they protect the grapes in a natural way, allowing us to reduce the amount of sulfites.